There is unspeakable darkness that clings to The Goblin Market. It is shrouded in mystery, fear, and excitement. Our souls long for wonderment that breaks away from the monotony of our daily lives even if it means sinking into the darkest parts of our hearts. The desire that dwells in those dark pits that grant our defining humanity seem immortalizing to these Goblins – the Autumn People, The Beings on the Other Side of the Mirror – and everywhere they go, insidious smiles at bewildered faces of patrons of all sizes, shapes, and creeds are bound to follow.


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The Man Who Laughs: Inspiration for the JokerThe Man Who Laughs (1928) is an American silent film directed by the German Expressionist filmmaker Paul Leni. The film is an adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel of the same name and stars Conrad Veidt as Gwynplaine and Mary Philbin as the blind Dea. The film is known for the grim carnival freak-like grin on the character Gwynplaine’s face, which often leads it to be classified as a horror film. Film critic Roger Ebert stated, “The Man Who Laughs is a melodrama, at times even a swashbuckler, but so steeped in Expressionist gloom that it plays like a horror film.”In 1940, comic book artist Jerry Robinson used Gwynplaine’s lanky physique and grotesque grin as the visual inspiration for the Joker, Batman’s archenemy. There the similarity ends, however; Gwynplaine is an embittered hero, while the Joker is a psychopathic criminal.In the 1970s, Bob Kane acknowledged the inspiration for the Joker, and it was later explicitly referenced in the graphic novel, Batman: The Man Who Laughs. Comic book artist Brian Bolland said that watching The Man Who Laughs was one of his inspirations for drawing the graphic novel Batman: The Killing Joke (1988). In the episode “Wild Cards” of the Justice League animated series (2003), The Joker infiltrated a TV station by using the alias “Gwynplaine Entertainment.”You can watch the original silent film here:http://youtu.be/zCD7YgK2AdkFor Purchase: http://www.amazon.com/Paul-Lenis-The-Man-Laughs/dp/B0000B1A1J/ref=sr_1_1?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1345747976&sr=1-1&keywords=the+man+who+laughs+dvd
 
The Man Who Laughs: 
Inspiration for the Joker

The Man Who Laughs (1928) is an American silent film directed by the German Expressionist filmmaker Paul Leni. The film is an adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel of the same name and stars Conrad Veidt as Gwynplaine and Mary Philbin as the blind Dea. The film is known for the grim carnival freak-like grin on the character Gwynplaine’s face, which often leads it to be classified as a horror film. Film critic Roger Ebert stated, “The Man Who Laughs is a melodrama, at times even a swashbuckler, but so steeped in Expressionist gloom that it plays like a horror film.”

In 1940, comic book artist Jerry Robinson used Gwynplaine’s lanky physique and grotesque grin as the visual inspiration for the Joker, Batman’s archenemy. There the similarity ends, however; Gwynplaine is an embittered hero, while the Joker is a psychopathic criminal.

In the 1970s, Bob Kane acknowledged the inspiration for the Joker, and it was later explicitly referenced in the graphic novel, Batman: The Man Who Laughs. Comic book artist Brian Bolland said that watching The Man Who Laughs was one of his inspirations for drawing the graphic novel Batman: The Killing Joke (1988). In the episode “Wild Cards” of the Justice League animated series (2003), The Joker infiltrated a TV station by using the alias “Gwynplaine Entertainment.”

You can watch the original silent film here:http://youtu.be/
zCD7YgK2Adk

For Purchase: http://www.amazon.com/Paul-Lenis-The-Man-Laughs/dp/B0000B1A1J/ref=sr_1_1?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1345747976&sr=1-1&keywords=the+man+who+laughs+dvd

 

posted 13 hours ago / 23 notes / reblog
Silent Hills - TGS 2014 Trailer (PS4) (HD)
posted 16 hours ago / 11 notes / reblog
Artist : Vania ZouravliovWebsite : http://www.vaniazouravliov.com/

Artist : Vania Zouravliov
Website : http://www.vaniazouravliov.com/

posted 18 hours ago / 8 notes / reblog
"Seance" By Stephen Mackey Website:http://www.stephenmackey.com/

"Seance"
By Stephen Mackey
Website:http://www.stephenmackey.com/

posted 1 day ago / 41 notes / reblog
Nazgul by Lucy ReynoldsWeb: http://lucyreynoldsart.squarespace.com/Purchase Prints of Lucy Reynolds work here: http://lucyreynoldsart.bigcartel.com/

Nazgul by Lucy Reynolds
Web: http://lucyreynoldsart.squarespace.com/
Purchase Prints of Lucy Reynolds work here: http://lucyreynoldsart.bigcartel.com/

posted 1 day ago / 4 notes / reblog
Prayers of Mother NatureBy Jesse KeisalaWebsite: http://drawcrowd.com/jessekeisala

Prayers of Mother Nature
By Jesse Keisala
Website: http://drawcrowd.com/jessekeisala

posted 1 day ago / 22 notes / reblog
"Song of the Undead"
Self Portrait by Cristina Otero
Website: http://www.cristinaotero.com/

"Song of the Undead"

Self Portrait by Cristina Otero

Website: http://www.cristinaotero.com/

posted 1 day ago / 14 notes / reblog

the-darkest-of-lights:

How to make sigils, a tutorial in my book of shadows.

[Do not repost without permission /remove caption or remove source]

(via winneganfake)

posted 1 day ago / 2,163 notes / reblog
" Black is the colour of womb and tomb; we meet at night on the dark of the moon. White is the colour of bone and ash; to speak to the dead we bathe and fast. Red is the colour of blood and death; we rub the bones and give them breath."
-The Necromancer’s Chant, Sarah Anne Lawless (via thecadaverousportrait)

(via winneganfake)

posted 3 days ago / 2,148 notes / reblog
Ouija Board Coffee Table And CarpetConcept by Dave’s Geeky Hockey + Ideas Source and more info: http://davesgeekyideas.com/2013/10/28/ouija-board-coffee-table-and-carpet/

Ouija Board Coffee Table And Carpet
Concept by Dave’s Geeky Hockey + Ideas 

Source and more info: http://davesgeekyideas.com/2013/10/28/ouija-board-coffee-table-and-carpet/

posted 3 days ago / 20 notes / reblog
Facts, Myth, and Lore about RavensThe raven - bird of mystery, magic and omens both good and bad. Raven symbolism is rich and plentiful, with a plethora of raven mythology, raven lore and raven superstitions available from a wealth of cultures.The raven often has a bad press, for being a carrion bird it is ultimately associated with death, and consequently considered a bad omen by many, or a forewarning of war.But there is much more to this enigmatic and intelligent bird than death, darkness and destruction. Raven is a trickster, a protector, a teacher. and a bringer of great magic.Raven Biology: Natural History of the RavenAbout the RavenCorvus Corax. Member of the crow familyThe raven is not only the largest member of the crow family, but the largest perching bird in the world. An extremely intelligent bird, the raven was once extremely common, but persecution now finds it only in remote areas such as cliffs, mountains and moors.The adult is completely black with a shaggy throat and heavy bill. It flies higher than the crow and is adept at aerial acrobatics.It is a carrion bird, feeding the likes of dead sheep, and will also kill its own food also, including small mammals and birds, reptiles, as well as taking eggs and eating insects and seeds.Ravens prefer to nest in a sheltered spot, favouring a rock crevice but also opting for trees. They build their nests from earth, moss, twigs and heather stalks, lining it with hair and wool. They raise just one brood per year, from February to March, which consists of 4-6 eggs.Ravens are extremely intelligent and in some cases can even learn to talk.Raven Lore: Folklore & LegendsThe Raven and WaterThe raven has a plethora of lore surrounding it. Richly interwoven into Celtic and Norse mythology, it also features in many superstitions and countless legends and stories, from Noah to the Tower of London.Those interested in perusing the very early stories of ravens should note that they often speak of the raven as the crow.The raven is often associated with water, often with the finding of water, or lack of it. Sacrificing gods sent the raven for water, but the bird delayed his mission to wait for some figs to ripen. Angry, the gods punished the raven by cursing him with a great thirst in the summer, which is said to be why the raven croaks.The Raven, Death and WarThe raven is also, quite famously, known as an omen of death. Being carrion feeders, seeing them feeding on gibbet corpses was once a common sight, and most likely where the association arose. A famous example of ravens being portends of death include the Roman philosopher, statesman and political theorist Cicero being forewarned of his death by the fluttering of ravens.Raven is a war bird. The Danes believed that observing ravens could help foretell the outcome of a battle. Indeed, they are said to have foretold the deaths of Plato and Tiberius, and told the Irish god Lugh of the invasion of the Formorians in Celtic mythology.The Raven and ProphecyThe raven is also frequently linked with prophecy, further enhancing its status as a bird of the occult. Not only was it a messenger of the gods, both as an informant and as a guide, but it also was thought to be the most prophetic of all birds. People are still referred to as having “the foresight of ravens”.Raven Augery and SymbolismRavens and the Weather, Negative Raven SuperstitionsWeather Raven Lore:Ravens facing the direction of a clouded sun foretell hot weatherIf you see a raven preening, rain is on the wayRaven Superstitions of Death and WarRavens flying towards each other signify an omen of warSeeing a raven tapping on a window foretold deathIf a raven is heard croaking near a house, there will be a death in itIf a raven flies around the chimney of a sick person’s house, they will diePositive Raven SuperstitionsMany parts of Celtic Britain and Ireland view the raven as a good omen:Shetland and Orkney - if a maiden sees a raven at Imbolc she can foretell the direction of her future husband’s home by following the raven’s path of flightWales - if a raven perches on a roof, it means prosperity for the familyScotland - deerstalkers believed it bode well to hear a raven before setting out on a huntIreland - ravens with white feathers were believed a good omen, especially if they had white on the wings. Ravens flying on your right hand or croaking simultaneously were also considered good omensSource and to read the rest of this excellent article:http://www.squidoo.com/raven-symbolism-lore
[ Image is a vintage illustration of a Raven circa 1830s ]

Facts, Myth, and Lore about Ravens

The raven - bird of mystery, magic and omens both good and bad. Raven symbolism is rich and plentiful, with a plethora of raven mythology, raven lore and raven superstitions available from a wealth of cultures.

The raven often has a bad press, for being a carrion bird it is ultimately associated with death, and consequently considered a bad omen by many, or a forewarning of war.

But there is much more to this enigmatic and intelligent bird than death, darkness and destruction. Raven is a trickster, a protector, a teacher. and a bringer of great magic.


Raven Biology: Natural History of the Raven
About the Raven

Corvus Corax. Member of the crow family

The raven is not only the largest member of the crow family, but the largest perching bird in the world. An extremely intelligent bird, the raven was once extremely common, but persecution now finds it only in remote areas such as cliffs, mountains and moors.

The adult is completely black with a shaggy throat and heavy bill. It flies higher than the crow and is adept at aerial acrobatics.

It is a carrion bird, feeding the likes of dead sheep, and will also kill its own food also, including small mammals and birds, reptiles, as well as taking eggs and eating insects and seeds.

Ravens prefer to nest in a sheltered spot, favouring a rock crevice but also opting for trees. They build their nests from earth, moss, twigs and heather stalks, lining it with hair and wool. They raise just one brood per year, from February to March, which consists of 4-6 eggs.

Ravens are extremely intelligent and in some cases can even learn to talk.

Raven Lore: Folklore & Legends
The Raven and Water
The raven has a plethora of lore surrounding it. Richly interwoven into Celtic and Norse mythology, it also features in many superstitions and countless legends and stories, from Noah to the Tower of London.

Those interested in perusing the very early stories of ravens should note that they often speak of the raven as the crow.

The raven is often associated with water, often with the finding of water, or lack of it. Sacrificing gods sent the raven for water, but the bird delayed his mission to wait for some figs to ripen. Angry, the gods punished the raven by cursing him with a great thirst in the summer, which is said to be why the raven croaks.

The Raven, Death and War

The raven is also, quite famously, known as an omen of death. Being carrion feeders, seeing them feeding on gibbet corpses was once a common sight, and most likely where the association arose. A famous example of ravens being portends of death include the Roman philosopher, statesman and political theorist Cicero being forewarned of his death by the fluttering of ravens.

Raven is a war bird. The Danes believed that observing ravens could help foretell the outcome of a battle. Indeed, they are said to have foretold the deaths of Plato and Tiberius, and told the Irish god Lugh of the invasion of the Formorians in Celtic mythology.
The Raven and Prophecy

The raven is also frequently linked with prophecy, further enhancing its status as a bird of the occult. Not only was it a messenger of the gods, both as an informant and as a guide, but it also was thought to be the most prophetic of all birds. People are still referred to as having “the foresight of ravens”.

Raven Augery and Symbolism

Ravens and the Weather, Negative Raven Superstitions

Weather Raven Lore:

Ravens facing the direction of a clouded sun foretell hot weather

If you see a raven preening, rain is on the way

Raven Superstitions of Death and War

Ravens flying towards each other signify an omen of war

Seeing a raven tapping on a window foretold death

If a raven is heard croaking near a house, there will be a death in it

If a raven flies around the chimney of a sick person’s house, they will die

Positive Raven Superstitions

Many parts of Celtic Britain and Ireland view the raven as a good omen:

Shetland and Orkney - if a maiden sees a raven at Imbolc she can foretell the direction of her future husband’s home by following the raven’s path of flight

Wales - if a raven perches on a roof, it means prosperity for the family

Scotland - deerstalkers believed it bode well to hear a raven before setting out on a hunt

Ireland - ravens with white feathers were believed a good omen, especially if they had white on the wings. Ravens flying on your right hand or croaking simultaneously were also considered good omens

Source and to read the rest of this excellent article:http://www.squidoo.com/raven-symbolism-lore

[ Image is a vintage illustration of a Raven circa 1830s ]

posted 6 days ago / 39 notes / reblog
The Gambler’s Case
By Tormented Artifacts
….The original case, found in the remnants of the burned down Alden Hotel had been charred on it’s outside, but when opened, reveled a pair of card decks, a number of poker chips, and other paraphenalia. The Ravenswood Institute made no headway into discovering the truth behind the strange cards, and their stranger owner, until someone made a connection between the initials appearing on the case, and the infamous Windrow family…
This exquisite artist has a website to peruse their sculptures, leatherwork, and commission pieces that you can find here. 

The Gambler’s Case

By Tormented Artifacts

….The original case, found in the remnants of the burned down Alden Hotel had been charred on it’s outside, but when opened, reveled a pair of card decks, a number of poker chips, and other paraphenalia. The Ravenswood Institute made no headway into discovering the truth behind the strange cards, and their stranger owner, until someone made a connection between the initials appearing on the case, and the infamous Windrow family…

This exquisite artist has a website to peruse their sculptures, leatherwork, and commission pieces that you can find here

posted 6 days ago / 6 notes / reblog
Figure with Mask and SkullBy Ray DonleyWebsite: http://www.raydonley-online.com/

Figure with Mask and Skull
By Ray Donley
Website: http://www.raydonley-online.com/

posted 6 days ago / 41 notes / reblog
weirdletter:

Nightmare Magazine, Issue #24, edited by John Joseph Adams, Creepy Hemlock Press, September 2014. Cover art by Sam Guay, info and free version: nightmare-magazine.com.
'Nightmare is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In Nightmare’s pages, you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales, to visceral psychological horror. This month, we have original fiction from Sunny Moraine (“Singing with All My Skin and Bone”) and Daniel Josè Older (“Animal”). For reprints, we have work from Charles Grant (“Old Friends”) and Lisa Tuttle (“The Man in the Ditch”). In the latest installment of our column on horror, “The H Word,” Lesley Bannatyne will be examining the history of horror and horror’s favorite holiday, Halloween. We’ve also got author spotlights with our authors, a showcase on our cover artist, and a feature interview with Welcome to Night Vale’s Cecil Baldwin.'
FROM THE EDITOR Editorial, September 2014 by John Joseph Adams
FICTION Singing with All My Skin and Bone by Sunny Moraine Old Friends by Charles L. Grant Animal by Daniel José Older The Man in the Ditch by Lisa Tuttle
NOVEL EXCERPTS It Waits Below by Eric Red Buster Voodoo by Mason James Cole
NONFICTION The H Word: Horror and Halloween by Lesley Bannatyne Artist Gallery by Sam Guay Artist Spotlight: Sam Guay by Marina J. Lostetter Interview: Cecil Baldwin by The Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy
AUTHOR SPOTLIGHTS Sunny Moraine Charles L. Grant Daniel José Older Lisa Tuttle
MISCELLANY Coming Attractions Stay Connected Subscriptions & Ebooks About the Editor

weirdletter:

Nightmare Magazine, Issue #24, edited by John Joseph Adams, Creepy Hemlock Press, September 2014. Cover art by Sam Guay, info and free version: nightmare-magazine.com.

'Nightmare is an online horror and dark fantasy magazine. In Nightmare’s pages, you will find all kinds of horror fiction, from zombie stories and haunted house tales, to visceral psychological horror. This month, we have original fiction from Sunny Moraine (“Singing with All My Skin and Bone”) and Daniel Josè Older (“Animal”). For reprints, we have work from Charles Grant (“Old Friends”) and Lisa Tuttle (“The Man in the Ditch”). In the latest installment of our column on horror, “The H Word,” Lesley Bannatyne will be examining the history of horror and horror’s favorite holiday, Halloween. We’ve also got author spotlights with our authors, a showcase on our cover artist, and a feature interview with Welcome to Night Vale’s Cecil Baldwin.'

FROM THE EDITOR
Editorial, September 2014 by John Joseph Adams

FICTION
Singing with All My Skin and Bone by Sunny Moraine
Old Friends by Charles L. Grant
Animal by Daniel José Older
The Man in the Ditch by Lisa Tuttle

NOVEL EXCERPTS
It Waits Below by Eric Red
Buster Voodoo by Mason James Cole

NONFICTION
The H Word: Horror and Halloween by Lesley Bannatyne
Artist Gallery by Sam Guay
Artist Spotlight: Sam Guay by Marina J. Lostetter
Interview: Cecil Baldwin by The Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHTS
Sunny Moraine
Charles L. Grant
Daniel José Older
Lisa Tuttle

MISCELLANY
Coming Attractions
Stay Connected
Subscriptions & Ebooks
About the Editor

posted 6 days ago / 26 notes / reblog
Satyr Hoof BootsArtist’s deviant art page: http://horseking.deviantart.com/

Satyr Hoof Boots
Artist’s deviant art page: http://horseking.deviantart.com/

posted 1 week ago / 51 notes / reblog